(x)

(Source: jongritte)

poesie-florale:

this was a gift for my girlfriend, who loves mozart l’opera rock as much as i do. also look at it, Juliette, i know you love this shit as well XD

poesie-florale:

this was a gift for my girlfriend, who loves mozart l’opera rock as much as i do. also look at it, Juliette, i know you love this shit as well XD

chainfour:

starrose17:

ladyhawke81:

Vikings - Athelstan [Season 2 Promo]

where the hell did this hd quality come from?!!??!

mmmm why yes I do want to see every pore on his face

ask-curtisrx:

gallade-x-treme:

zeldaisawesomeness:

it’s almost time

IT IS AUGUST

ask-curtisrx:

gallade-x-treme:

zeldaisawesomeness:

it’s almost time

IT IS AUGUST

image

futurejournalismproject:

Mapping Perspective
Via Al Jazeera:

Why do maps always show the north as up? For those who don’t just take it for granted, the common answer is that Europeans made the maps and they wanted to be on top. But there’s really no good reason for the north to claim top-notch cartographic real estate over any other bearing, as an examination of old maps from different places and periods can confirm…
…There is nothing inevitable or intrinsically correct — not in geographic, cartographic or even philosophical terms — about the north being represented as up, because up on a map is a human construction, not a natural one. Some of the very earliest Egyptian maps show the south as up, presumably equating the Nile’s northward flow with the force of gravity. And there was a long stretch in the medieval era when most European maps were drawn with the east on the top. If there was any doubt about this move’s religious significance, they eliminated it with their maps’ pious illustrations, whether of Adam and Eve or Christ enthroned. In the same period, Arab map makers often drew maps with the south facing up, possibly because this was how the Chinese did it.
Things changed with the age of exploration. Like the Renaissance, this era didn’t start in Northern Europe. It began in the Mediterranean, somewhere between Europe and the Arab world. In the 14th and 15th centuries, increasingly precise navigational maps of the Mediterranean Sea and its many ports called Portolan charts appeared. They were designed for use by mariners navigating the sea’s trade routes with the help of a recently adopted technology, the compass. These maps had no real up or down — pictures and words faced in all sorts of directions, generally pointing inward from the edge of the map — but they all included a compass rose with north clearly distinguished from the other directions.

Image: A perfectly good map. Select to embiggen.

futurejournalismproject:

Mapping Perspective

Via Al Jazeera:

Why do maps always show the north as up? For those who don’t just take it for granted, the common answer is that Europeans made the maps and they wanted to be on top. But there’s really no good reason for the north to claim top-notch cartographic real estate over any other bearing, as an examination of old maps from different places and periods can confirm…

…There is nothing inevitable or intrinsically correct — not in geographic, cartographic or even philosophical terms — about the north being represented as up, because up on a map is a human construction, not a natural one. Some of the very earliest Egyptian maps show the south as up, presumably equating the Nile’s northward flow with the force of gravity. And there was a long stretch in the medieval era when most European maps were drawn with the east on the top. If there was any doubt about this move’s religious significance, they eliminated it with their maps’ pious illustrations, whether of Adam and Eve or Christ enthroned. In the same period, Arab map makers often drew maps with the south facing up, possibly because this was how the Chinese did it.

Things changed with the age of exploration. Like the Renaissance, this era didn’t start in Northern Europe. It began in the Mediterranean, somewhere between Europe and the Arab world. In the 14th and 15th centuries, increasingly precise navigational maps of the Mediterranean Sea and its many ports called Portolan charts appeared. They were designed for use by mariners navigating the sea’s trade routes with the help of a recently adopted technology, the compass. These maps had no real up or down — pictures and words faced in all sorts of directions, generally pointing inward from the edge of the map — but they all included a compass rose with north clearly distinguished from the other directions.

Image: A perfectly good map. Select to embiggen.

nervoushiccup:

I feel like I, and many other tumblr users, are pretty much experiment 625 from Lilo and Stitch

image

he literally has all of the same powers as stitch

image

He had potential to do something great. He saw what Stitch and all the other experiments were doing, but he was just like

hey

you know what sounds good

a sandwich


Hadley’s voice never fails in getting me inspired, ‘Just Let Go’ is so gorgeous I couldn’t help but do something about it. Including the lovely colors of the album’s cover!Trying some watercolors. Just that.
Also: Just Let Go

Hadley’s voice never fails in getting me inspired, ‘Just Let Go’ is so gorgeous I couldn’t help but do something about it. Including the lovely colors of the album’s cover!

Trying some watercolors. Just that.

Also: Just Let Go

immortaltrash:

when you remember something embarrassing you did 6 years ago

image

tindolini:


A matter of hours now until holiday! Unrelated, I’ll leave you with @MikeColbourne @jamesgant and @chrisedwards79 .. 

[x]

tindolini:

A matter of hours now until holiday! Unrelated, I’ll leave you with and ..

[x]

why I love the Les Mis cast

(Source: petratodd)

(Source: octoberblood)

subsequentibis:

lagging behind a little, but here’s combeferre in my clothing for les mis 69. might not get the prompt for today (draw a character you don’t draw much of) done because my dad’s brewing and that tends to stink up the house so i want to go somewhere else most of the day.  since it’s pretty sketchy and difficult to make out, this is the shirt he’s wearing. he’s also got a Hellblazer book and one of my coffee mugs.

subsequentibis:

lagging behind a little, but here’s combeferre in my clothing for les mis 69. might not get the prompt for today (draw a character you don’t draw much of) done because my dad’s brewing and that tends to stink up the house so i want to go somewhere else most of the day.
since it’s pretty sketchy and difficult to make out, this is the shirt he’s wearing. he’s also got a Hellblazer book and one of my coffee mugs.

cy-lindric:

In The Flesh.

jessehimself:

Eddie Vedder, Mike and GE Smith performing the Dylan Classic. Masters Of War (live at the Bob Dylan 30th anniversary)